U.S. Environment Body EPA Says Fracking May Be Contaminating Groundwater After All #BluewaterPure

The following is via the Bluewater Group. It is not an ad, nor is it a paid message.

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA today said activities in the hydraulic fracturing water cycle ‘can impact—and have impacted—drinking water resources’. The EPA’s latest findings are worrying in a world where the planet’s water resources are already under threat of contamination from multiple sources, according to Bluewater, a world leader in residential water purification.

“The EPA has reversed course on fracking since issuing a version of its study a year ago and appears to have backed away from a conclusion that there was no evidence that fracking contaminates water supplies,” said Bluewater spokesperson David Noble. He noted how the latest EPA report says it has found evidence that fracking does indeed cause contamination of drinking water due in part to the use of chemicals during the hydraulic fracturing process.

Dr. Thomas A. Burke, EPA’s Science Advisor and Deputy Assistant Administrator of EPA’s Office of Research and Development, described the report as “most complete compilation to date of national scientific data on the relationship of drinking water resources and hydraulic fracturing.”

Dr Burke added: “The value of high quality science has never been more important in helping to guide decisions around our nation’s fragile water resources. EPA’s assessment provides the scientific foundation for local decision makers, industry, and communities that are looking to protect public health and drinking water resources and make more informed decisions about hydraulic fracturing activities,” said Dr. Thomas A. Burke.

The EPA study, called ‘Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas: Impacts from the Hydraulic Fracturing Water Cycle on Drinking Water Resources in the United States’, identified cases of impacts on drinking water at each stage in the hydraulic fracturing water cycle. Impacts cited in the report generally occurred near hydraulically fractured oil and gas production wells and ranged in severity, from temporary changes in water quality, to contamination that made private drinking water wells unusable.

EPA’s final assessment benefited from extensive stakeholder engagement with states, tribes, industry, non-governmental organizations, the scientific community, and the public. This broad engagement helped to ensure that the final assessment report reflects current practices in hydraulic fracturing and uses all data and information available to the agency.

EPA said its new report advances the science. The understanding of the potential impacts from hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources will continue to improve over time as new information becomes available, according to EPA.

“The EPA study identified certain conditions under which impacts from hydraulic fracturing activities can be more frequent or severe, such as water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing in areas with limited or declining groundwater resources, and spills of hydraulic fracturing fluids and chemicals that result in large volumes or high concentrations of chemicals reaching groundwater resources,” said David Noble.

For a copy of the study, visit www.epa.gov/hfstudy.

Support Fire Prevention Month with Smokey the Bear #FirePreventionMonth

The Ad Council, the U.S. Forest Service, and the National Association of State Foresters ask for your support in raising awareness for Fire Prevention Month. The sad truth is that nearly 9 out of 10 wildfires are still caused by humans.

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  • In 2014 there were 7,933 wildfires caused by lightning, but 55,679 wildfires caused by human error (as reported to the National Interagency Fire Center).
  • In 2014 more than 3.5 million acres burned due to wildfires in the U.S. of those, more than 1.5 million acres burned due to human-caused wildfires.

Although most of us don’t behave this way intentionally, each year we learn of devastating wildfires caused by careless behavior which can impact millions of acres of forest and thousands of homes.

We can also be more responsible in our homes when it comes to fire safety as well. Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Only one in five home fires was reported during these hours.

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Take the pledge and encourage your readers to do the same –
Pledge to be smart when using fire outdoors so you can do your part to prevent wildfires.


Take care when you are out and about, or even at home. Remember- only you can prevent forest fires!

How Much Do You Know About Recycling ?

My family and I are pretty good about recycling and reducing waste.  We try to reuse as much as possible, we fix and repair instead of replacing when possible, compost, recycle, and almost never use disposable items in our lunchboxes and the like. Getting to know just how much you can save to help is a matter of reading up on the topic. The rules are easy to follow, and there are many places where you can learn more about the topic. Whether it’s a quick article, or a step-by-step guide. We only get one planet, right?

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However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t use a refresher course now and again, or learn new and helpful information to assist us in learning to do it better, or show us a new way that might work well.

According to a recent study conducted for the Ad Council, 52% of Americans don’t know which items can be recycled in the bathroom. And only 10% of Americans have a recycling bin in their bathroom, compared to the 45% who have them in the kitchen.

There’s a lot you can do to help increase recycling rates. With Earth Day coming up on 4/22, there’s no better time than now to help spread the word.

Keep America Beautiful, the national nonprofit organization, recently launched the newest phase of the “I Want to Be Recycled public service advertising campaign. It aims to raise awareness and inspire individuals to recycle more with the latest series of ads focused on recycling in the bathroom.
[Read more…]

Run for the Planet

National Geographic Kids has launched a new campaign to try and break not one, but TWO, Guinness World Records. The program is called Run for the Planet, and it is an effort to encourage children to do something good for both their health and the environment.

  • The first record they are going after is the longest shoe chain. Participants are encouraged to send in used athletic shoes, which will be tied together to break the record and then recycled into athletic surfaces, such as basketball courts and running tracks. This record [Read more…]