My Child Needs Glasses: Tips For Picking The Right Kind

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Do you remember the first time you realized you needed glasses? More than likely it was your parents who suggested maybe you needed to use them. Now you are in the same position, only this time you are the parent and you know your child like the back of your hand. That is why understanding if your child needs glasses and what to look for when searching for the right pair is crucial.

With the advancement of technology, gone are the days of only being able to go into an eye care center to purchase a pair of frames. Now you can shop online at www.eyeglasses.com or any of your favorite online stores. Before you go on an eyeglasses shopping spree, here are a few things you need to know about determining if your child has poor vision and what to look for when picking out glasses for your child.

Signs To Look For

This can be really tough to see, especially if your child is at the pre-verbal stage or have cannot quite read the eye chart just yet. All the ways the doctor would normally test for eyesight cannot be used. Not to worry. There are still telltale signs that you can look out for.

Squinting

If you notice your child squinting a lot while they are walking or looking at something up close or far away, your child may need glasses. When your child squints he or she could be experiencing a refractive error. This only affects how your child’s eyes focus on an image, showing up blurry. Your child squinting is a way your child may be trying to self-correct the problem. After a while of too much squinting, that can cause other problems down the line, so if you see your child squinting, get him or her some glasses.

Tilting Head Or Covering One Eye

Another way your child might be self-correcting is through tilting his or her head as well as covering one eye. Doing this helps adjust the angle of vision as an attempt to increase clarity. It is sometimes an indication of eyes that are misaligned. It can even be a sign that your child has lazy eye, formally called amblyopia, one of the most common eye disorders among children.

Sitting Too Close To The TV Or Holding Devices Too Close To Eyes

This is a telltale sign that your child may have some vision issues. If you notice your child is often holding cellphones or tablets too close to their eyes, lower their head while reading and sitting too close to the television, your child may have myopia. Myopia, more commonly referred to as nearsightedness, allows for those who have it to see things bigger and clearer when they are close up while seeing things from a farther range is more difficult.

Rubbing Eyes Excessively

Your child rubbing his or her eye constantly may be a sign that your child’s eyes are experiencing eye fatigue or strain. It could be a sign of a variety of vision issues like allergic conjunctivitis. Keep notice if you see your child doing this.

Frequent Headaches Or Eye Pain

Headaches and eye pain are both signs of overexertion of the eyes in an effort to improve focus of blurred vision. If your child is frequently complaining about headaches and eye pain, listen to your child. They may have some vision issues that need to be addressed as soon as possible.

Tough Time Concentrating On School Work

Paying attention and engaging in schoolwork can be hard when you are not able to see the lesson plans and notes on the board in the class. It is difficult to know what is going on in class when you can barely see anything. If you notice that your child has displayed at least one other sign and he or she is having issues in school, it could be a vision problem. Kids need have to quickly and correctly switch their visual focus from near to far on a variety of things around the classroom like chalkboards, computer screens, textbooks and tablets. Your child’s lack of motivation to engage in schoolwork may be a symptom of poor vision.

After reading all of this you may be convinced that your child needs to see a doctor. Book the appointment with your child’s eye doctor and see what he or she has to say. They may discover a deeper issue, or they may just give you a prescription for frames. If the latter, here are some things to consider when shopping for glasses fit for a kid.

Polycarbonate Lenses

Polycarbonate is an impact-resistant material that can also be found in safety goggles. They do not shatter on impacts like regular glass or plastic lenses. This lens material is thinner and lighter to the touch than plastic lenses. Thinner and lighter means a better cosmetic appearance and more comfort. They also have built-in protection from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Making sure your child’s lenses are made with this material reduces the likelihood of eye injuries, especially if you have a particularly active child.

Scratch-Resistant Coatings

Make your child’s glasses last longer by getting both polycarbonate lenses with scratch-resistant coatings. The extra layer of protection this coating provides gives your lenses superpowers that make it even more resistant to scratching. Keep in mind that opting for scratch-resistant coating will give you a better scratch warranty. Remember that lenses of all kinds, no matter how many protective coatings you put on, are not completely scratch-proof. With scratch-resistant coating as well as the warranty, you will get the most of your money as your child’s glasses will last a longer.

Tints

Tings are not necessary, but adding photochromatic lenses is a great opportunity to lump you child’s eyeglasses and sunglasses into one item. Photochromatic lenses, or tinted lenses, automatically darken when your kid goes outdoors into the sun. When your child comes back indoors, they glasses automatically lighten back up. This is a very convenient feature because your child does not have to choose between wearing sunglasses or being able to see.

Silicone Nose Pads

It is imperative that your child has comfortable nose pads, otherwise your child may never want to wear his or her glasses. Silicone nose pads are the most comfortable because they are soft while having a non-slip surface. This helps keep eyeglasses stay in the right position on your child’s face.

Spring Hinges

These are put on your child’s glasses to allow the frame’s temple to bend outward when your child puts his or her glasses on or off. This allows your kid to be a little rough with their pair of frames without breaking them. You can also opt for flexible frames, but keep in mind that these are typically more expensive.

Warranties

You want to make sure you are going to doctor offices or opticals that give warranties out for kids’ eyeglasses for at least a year from your purchase date. Remember that your child is still growing and they may outgrow these frames within a year, so asking for a two-year warranty is not needed. Ask your doctor for more information about the different warranty options you have.

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